Ages and StagesĀ 

Ages and Stages 


 My vision of the future is no longer people taking exams and proceeding then on that certification . . . but of individuals passing from one stage of independence to a higher [one], by means of their own activity through their own effort of will, which constitutes the inner evolution of the individual.

—Maria Montessori, From Childhood to Adolescence


The Montessori Developmental Continuum

 

Montessori education is a flow experience; it builds on the continuing self-construction of the child—daily, weekly, yearly—for the duration of the program. Although Montessori schools are divided into multi-age classrooms—parent infant (ages 0 to 3), preschool (ages 3 to 6), lower and upper elementary (ages 6 to 9 and 9 to 12), and middle school (ages 12 to 14)—the prepared environments introduce an uninterrupted series of learning passages, a continuum.

The prepared environments described in this section, along with their physical dimensions, desired outcomes, and documented results, carefully reflect the natural learning characteristics of the child at each stage of development. In Maria Montessori's metaphorical language, "the successive levels of education must conform to the successive personalities of the child."

 

The prepared environments and the role of the teacher in the classroom distinguish Montessori from other educational approaches. For example, independent activity constitutes about 80% of the work while teacher-directed activity accounts for the remaining 20%. The reverse percentages are generally true for traditional education. The special environments enable children to perform various tasks which induce thinking about relationships. The prepared environment also offers practical occasions for introducing social relationships through free interaction. The logical, sequential nature of the environment provides orderly structures that guide discovery: Theorems are discovered, not presented; spelling rules are derived through recognition of patterns, not merely memorized. Every aspect of the curriculum involves creative invention and careful, thoughtful analysis. In viewing learning outcomes at each Montessori level, it must be emphasized that why and how students arrive at what they know is just as important as what they know.

 

Learn more about Montessori programs for each age level:
Infant-Toddler Preschool Elementary | Middle School

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Happy Holidays from NAMTA!

Thank you for your patience and support during this transition to new locations for our office and our store.

We will be spending the next two weeks finalizing a new system for our store and catching up on memberships. The store will now be managed by Shopify, an online e-commerce system. It will go live and be ready for orders by January 7th.

The NAMTA staff will resume filling the orders at that time. We hope you find the new system easy to use and efficient. Please let us know if you have any difficulty.

In the meantime, we are thrilled to have the program for Seattle/Tacoma ready to announce. Please review our flier announcing this timely and important conference. We will begin registration at Montessori-namta.org on January 11th.

Best wishes as we celebrate the New Year.

The NAMTA Board and Staff